A rabbit's diet

Rabbits naturally eat throughout the day, and a good quality hay makes up the majority of their diet—about 80-90%. Below is a look at what a rabbit's dinner plate would look like.

Food pellets and raw vegetables and fruit are a a treat… but you may be surprised what is bad for them. 

Suitable veggies for a treat – spinach, kale, broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, spinach, apples (remove the seeds, they are poisonous), carrot tops, complete rabbit food pellets, romaine lettuce.

Do not feed them  – most types of lettuce, carrots, potato, beans, rhubarb, tomato leaves, foxgloves, buttercup, catnip, daffodil, dock leaves, ivy, elder, garlic, holly, honeysuckle, horse chestnuts, marigolds, onions, lawnmower clippings.

They might like these, feed a small amount to start with to avoid stomach upsets. If their droppings become runny don’t feed them it again – asparagus, basil, beet tops, blackberry (fruit, leaves and stems), blueberry, bok choy, brambles, celery, cilantro, clover, collard greens, cucumber, dandelions, dill, endive, fennel, grass, mint, nettles, parsley, pear (seeds are poisonous), peas, radish tops, raspberry (fruit, leaves and stems), watercress.

How much? Rabbits will eat their fill and leave the rest, but don’t leave food to sit around in the bowls for days – even dry food – keep it all clean and fresh.

They need access to water, give them a choice of a water bottle and bowl.

Rabbits have two kinds of droppings - a soft kind which they will eat and a harder pellet which you will clear up when tidying their home. If they are not eating their soft pellets then it could be a sign that they are unwell.

Herbs

Basil
Borage 
Calendula
Chamomile
Clover (leaves and flowers)
Coriander
Dill
English Lavender
Mallow
Nettle
Oregano
Parsley
Peppermint
Rosemary
Sage 
Thyme
Yarrow

These are our favourites, for a full list click here.