Posts Tagged ‘cats’

Black cats get lucky

Monday, March 5th, 2012

Two identical young black cats were brought to us at the beginning of the year – they were hissing and frightened of human contact.

Fleck and Ozul were adopted by the Bourn family, who could see past their nervousness to see a handsome pair of cats.

Here they are in their home all settled, and their owners tell us “They about as feral as daffodils! They are soaking up all the love they can get.”

3 and 4 from left

fuss fuss (2) fleck

Etzio’s short story

Monday, September 12th, 2011
It doesn’t take long for an animal to steal your heart. It also doesn’t take long to make a difference in an animal’s life. It could be the five minutes it takes to make that call to the RSPCA when you see an animal in need; it could be the ten minutes of playtime when you volunteer at a rescue centre; it could be the moment a pet you adopted finds their new bed or a sunny spot in your home and know they can relax.

And although these moments are what make adopting a pet so enjoyable, we still find our older residents being overlooked. We strongly feel that these animals can give you just as many fond memories, just as many moments of feeling you have helped and just as much fun and joy.
Recently, a 14 year old cat was brought to us as a stray – he was underweight and with noticeable swollen glands, cataracts, hard of hearing and extremely arthritic. It was clear he hadn’t been cared for or loved for a long time before finally being picked up and brought into the Home. We named him Etzio.
With hundreds of cats coming into us every year it takes a special cat to stand out, but Etzio did and is fondly remembered by staff as a friendly boy, always ready to greet you at the pod window. Despite this, we know he was overlooked by visitors just because of his age and because he looked a bit scraggly.
But he wasn’t overlooked by Jess, who chooses to re-home older cats. Sadly, Etzio lived for just over a week in his new home. Jess told us “When a cat comes to the end of his or her days, it helps a little if I know that, in the time they have been with me, they have really known what it is like to be safe, happy and very much loved.”
In the past 20 years Jess has homed over 45 elderly and disadvantaged cats, but even in the short time she had with Etzio he really made an impression. “I can’t help feeling outraged that he had ended up in such a terrible state. My great hope is that if even one person is touched by his story, that might just be the one person who will see a cat like him one day and think to give him or her a helping hand.”
As you can see from this photo he felt safe and relaxed in Jess’s care. If someone had taken five minutes of their day to help him and he had been handed in earlier, perhaps they could have had more time together. However despite her loss, Jess tells us that she will continue to adopt.
“The joy of taking on an elderly ca, is immeasurable. For all the sadness of losing them, sooner than one would possibly lose a younger cat, there isn’t one cat that I regret having. Each one has only brought me joy and a sense of satisfaction in being the one who is lucky enough to love them until the end.”
If you think you can offer a home to an older cat, start by looking online here and visiting the cattery to talk to our staff.
http://www.bathcatsanddogshome.org.uk/rehoming/cats/?breed=&children=&animal=&age=over+10+years&gender=&submit=Search

It doesn’t take long for an animal to steal your heart. It also doesn’t take long to make a difference in an animal’s life. It could be the five minutes it takes to make that call to the RSPCA when you see an animal in need; it could be the ten minutes of playtime when you volunteer at a rescue centre; it could be the moment a pet you adopted finds their new bed or a sunny spot in your home and know they can relax.

And although these moments are what make adopting a pet so enjoyable, we still find our older residents being overlooked. We strongly feel that these animals can give you just as many fond memories, just as many moments of feeling you have helped and just as much fun and joy.

Recently, a 14 year old cat was brought to us as a stray – he was underweight and with noticeable swollen glands, cataracts, hard of hearing and extremely arthritic. It was clear he hadn’t been cared for or loved for a long time before finally being picked up and brought into the Home. We named him Etzio.21064 etzio a (2)

With hundreds of cats coming into us every year it takes a special cat to stand out, but Etzio did and is fondly remembered by staff as a friendly boy, always ready to greet you at the pod window. Despite this, we know he was overlooked by visitors just because of his age and because he looked a bit scraggly.

But he wasn’t overlooked by Jess, who chooses to re-home older cats. Sadly, Etzio lived for just over a week in his new home. Jess told us “When a cat comes to the end of his or her days, it helps a little if I know that, in the time they have been with me, they have really known what it is like to be safe, happy and very much loved.”

In the past 20 years Jess has homed over 45 elderly and disadvantaged cats, but even in the short time she had with Etzio he really made an impression. “I can’t help feeling outraged that he had ended up in such a terrible state. My great hope is that if even one person is touched by his story, that might just be the one person who will see a cat like him one day and think to give him or her a helping hand.”

etzio at home

As you can see from this photo he felt safe and relaxed in Jess’s care. If someone had taken five minutes of their day to help him and he had been handed in earlier, perhaps they could have had more time together.

However despite her loss, Jess tells us that she will continue to adopt.
“The joy of taking on an elderly cat is immeasurable. For all the sadness of losing them, sooner than one would possibly lose a younger cat, there isn’t one cat that I regret having. Each one has only brought me joy and a sense of satisfaction in being the one who is lucky enough to love them until the end.”
If you think you can offer a home to an older cat, start by looking online here and visiting the cattery to talk to our staff.

Don’t be put off by the ‘difficult’ ones

Friday, April 30th, 2010

Lottie LC

A message from owners of cats re-homed from us

Lottie and Wylye (formerly know as Nixie and Nancy) are two sisters who came to live with us in early December 2009. They had been in the Home for about 6 months having been brought in as feral kittens born in someone’s shed.

Lottie wouldn’t let anyone touch her (I’m still amazed anyone managed to get her in the basket) and Wylye wasn’t much better. The first night Lottie wouldn’t even come out of the basket to eat and overnight they decided the safest spot was wedged-in behind (and eventually inside!) the piano. Not an auspicious start, but being kittens they would come out for food, & whilst she was eating Wylye would let you stroke her.

After about 2 weeks I heard a loud purring one morning as I was dishing out the food – Lottie finally making some happy noises. Over Christmas they discovered the joys of an open fire in front of which Lottie luxuriated, and both would fuss round my legs as I prepared their dishes but still Lottie wouldn’t let herself be stroked.

Then one evening, after about 6 weeks of  trying to just gently touch her back, I almost accidentally managed to do so and in the middle of jumping up to run away you could almost see her stop and think  ‘…hum, actually, that is quite nice’. That one moment was all it took. We now have two affectionate, entertaining  and handsome cats, who will not yet let us pick them up (it will come) but who love being fussed and stroked (following one around the house in order to benefit from same) and who have fully relaxed in their new home (though Wylie is not quite as angelic as she appears on the photo.).

And the moral is? … don’t be too put off by cats who don’t immediately respond to you, give them space, security and time and they will come around. Having had feline friends for 25 years -  a pair of male cousins and latterly a lovely female who I still miss having lost her (aged 14) in September – all very affectionate, I will confess to having had some misgivings in the first few weeks of having our new friends but I’m glad we persevered & I rather think they are too.

 Jacqueline 

 chilled Lottie